Book Review: The Princess Saves Herself in This One

the princess saves herself in this oneTitle: The Princess Saves Herself in This One
Author:
 Amanda Lovelace
Genre: Poetry
Version: Paperback
Page Count: 199
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing
Synopsis: GoodReads
Notable Notables: Free verse poetry, Feminism
Recommended Readers: Women especially, but men should read this, too, honestly
Rating: ★★★☆☆

I’ve done it; I’ve finally read The Princess Saves Herself in This One by Amanda Lovelace. You might remember that I actually started my journey with Lovelace’s poetry via an ARC of The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This Onecontinuing with The Mermaid’s Voice Returns in This One. Yeah, I kinda did this whole thing backwards, but I’m happy to at last experience where Lovelace’s journey of finding her voice through poetry started, even though it wasn’t as strong as the others.

But that’s a good thing in this case. Lovelace grows in her poetry technique, depth, presentation, and subject matter as the Women Are Some Kind of Magic trilogy goes on. In fact, if I hadn’t fallen so in love with The Witch Doesn’t Burn in this One and been so similarly impressed with The Mermaid’s Voice Returns in This One, then I might have rated this collection higher. While I kept in mind that this was the first round and that I read these out of impact order, I still feel what I feel about Lovelace’s poetry here, and reason that—no matter what the timing may be—poetry will always be personal.

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Book Review: The Mermaid’s Voice Returns in This One

the mermaid's voice returns in this one
Title:
 
The Mermaid’s Voice Returns in This One
Author:
 Amanda Lovelace
Genre: Poetry
Version: ARC – eBook
Page Count: 210
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing
Synopsis: GoodReads
Notable Notables: Free verse poetry, Feminism
Recommended Readers: Women especially, but men should read this, too, honestly
Rating: ★★★★☆

Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

It’s been a hot minute since I read The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This Onethe second poetry collection in Amanda Lovelace’s Women Are Some Kind of Magic series. While I’ve still yet to read the first book, The Princess Saves Herself in This One, and therefore don’t have the full picture of this journey of growth, The Mermaid’s Voice Returns in This One still delivers on Lovelace’s trademark poetic voice in all its vulnerabilities and harsh truths.

I’ll go ahead and say now that The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One ranked higher for me simply because I related to its anger, ferocity, and zeal more than I did this collection’s emphasis on trauma and healing. I also enjoyed the former’s greater usage of imagery more, since here, the imagery surrounding mermaids and their returning voice held more of a subtle place than downright literal usage. (I actually felt there was more imagery used with stars than anything else.) But that’s because this collection’s imagery was more figurative, and it encompassed the entire journey, namely that of a woman (or any reader) reclaiming their voice and at last speaking openly about the traumas of their past and how tough the healing journey is.

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Most Anticipated Releases — March 2018

Back in the saddle again! It’s crazy how fast these months seem to be going by, but I’m going to try not to think about that.

Instead, I’m going to share with you my most anticipated book releases coming in March. I even have books on here this time that aren’t strictly YA. I’m so proud of me.

Children of Blood and BonePerhaps the book I’m most looking forward to out of all of them is Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi. The hype for it has been insane and apparently also well-deserved.

Zélie Adebola’s world was once full of magic and people who could control flames, harness waves, and even summon souls, but after the magic disappeared, a ruthless king began hunting down maji.

Alongside a rebel princess, Zélie must hide her growing powers and elude her enemies, including the crown prince. Steeped in West African culture and beliefs, Children of Blood and Bone sounds like it hits all the right targets for me. Plus, look at that cover. Absolutely stunning.

Release date: March 6th

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Book Review: The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One

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Title: The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One
Author:
 Amanda Lovelace
Genre: Poetry
Version: ARC – eBook
Page Count: 208
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing
Synopsis: GoodReads
Notable Notables: Free verse poetry, Feminism
Recommended Readers: Women especially, but men should read this, too, honestly
Rating: ★★★★★

Thank you, NetGalley, for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

My second foray into contemporary free verse poetry went much better than my last, if my high rating is any indication. The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One is my first read from Amanda Lovelace, covering topics ranging from historic female oppression to the 2017 Women’s March.

And I have to say, I thoroughly enjoyed myself.

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Book Review: Planting Gardens in Graves

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Title: Planting Gardens in Graves
Author:
 R. H. Sin
Genre: Poetry
Version: ARC – eBook
Page Count: 272
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing
Synopsis: GoodReads
Notable Notables: Free verse poetry
Recommended Readers: Anyone out there trying to move on from a bad relationship?
Rating: ★★☆☆☆

I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

I’m trying to understand the fascination behind this whole contemporary, free-style poetry thing.

Throughout high school and college, I developed a fondness for poetry, particularly the classic works of Shakespeare, John Donne, Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allen Poe, Maya Angelou, and Robert Frost. Once I was taught how to analyze poetry and understand what it was telling me, I learned to have a deep respect of poets in general because they accomplish such feats with words I don’t think I could ever manage myself. Rhyme scheme, meter, rhythm–the thought of trying to master all of this on top of language is daunting, but there are people who exist who accomplish it, and that is both stunning and humbling to me.

(That’s not even getting into those who can achieve epic poetry the likes of The Faerie Queen by Edmund Spenser. Those people are gods, and I live in fear and awe of them.)

Free verse poetry isn’t exactly new on the scene; even poets like Walt Whitman and Christina Rosetti composed some of their works in free verse, which possesses its own merits. But if Planting Gardens in Graves is any indication, I’m wondering what those merits are.

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